Case Study – Lower back pain due to flattened curvature

December 17, 2018 | By | Reply READ MORE...

CASE:
Mr. X, a 27 year old state-level volleyball player, referred to us by his friend, came in with complaints of :

  • Continuous dull pain in the lower back since 3 months and had increased in the last one month for no apparent reason.
  • Inability to sit for more than 20 minutes because of pain
  • Aggravation of pain every time he would bend his back forward.
  • Inability to work out due to pain.
  • Inability to play volleyball and recreational football.
  • Pain while turning to sides.

On a scale of 0-10, where 0 indicates no pain and 10 indicates the maximal pain that Mr. X can endure, his constant back ache was a 4/10, and when it got aggravated, it went to a 7/10.

PHYSICAL EVALUATION:

  • He is a tall, well-built person.
  • He had a flat back.
    cs_lower-back-pain-flatened-curve-01
  • Forward and backward bending was restricted because of pain in the back.
  • Side-bends were restricted and painful.
  • For somebody playing a high intensity sport, he had poor core and buttock strength.

INVESTIGATION:
MRI showed a bulge in L5-S1 intervertebral disc and narrowing of his lumbar canal.

HIS GOALS:
His goal was to be pain-free and to be able to play volleyball again.

OUR AIMS:
To recruit and increase the strength of the core and buttock muscles with the help of:

  • Moderate intensity core stability exercises. Since our core muscles act as a natural lumbar corset and plays a major role in keeping out spine stable, we concentrated a lot on his core stability exercises to achieve stability in and around the spine.
    cs_lower-back-pain-flatened-curve-02 cs_lower-back-pain-flatened-curve-03
  • Moderate to high intensity core and buttock strengthening exercises.
  • Volleyball specific rehab

TREATMENT:

Postural re-education: He was advised to maintain the correct postures while sitting and standing.

Patient education:
Do’s –

  • Turn to the side while getting up from the bed.
  • To take frequent breaks while sitting for long duration.

Don’t’s-

  • Do not lift anything heavy.
  • Bend from the knees, instead from the back while picking something up.
  • Avoid low seating, eg: bean bags.

Core and buttock training: We started with basic core exercises to strengthen the core and the back. We eventually progressed to moderate intensity core and buttock strengthening. Since our core muscles act as a natural lumbar corset and plays a major role in keeping out spine stable, we concentrated a lot on his core stability exercises to achieve stability in and around the spine.

Volleyball specific rehab: We eventually started Mr. X, on a volleyball specific rehab and functional training.

cs_lower-back-pain-flatened-curve-04

Mr. X was 70% better in 10 days and was completely pain free in about 3 weeks. He continued his home exercise program thereafter. He currently participated in the state championship and his team won the trophy.

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Category: Case Studies

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